Comm Eye Health Vol. 28 No. 91 2015. Published online 08 January, 2016

Eye injuries: improving our practice

A 10-year-old with corneal laceration and traumatic cataract after a stone hit him in the eye. CAMEROON. Faustin Ngounou
A 10-year-old with corneal laceration and traumatic cataract after a stone hit him in the eye. CAMEROON. Faustin Ngounou

This issue includes approaches for prevention and tips on how to assess, classify and manage eye injuries. Eye injuries affect people, not just eyes. People with eye injuries are in pain and have been through what was very likely a terrifying experience for them; they will also be anxious about their vision. We explain how to reassure and support patients, despite the difficult circumstances in which they find themselves. We also introduce the Ocular Trauma Score (OTS), based on the BETTS classification, which is there to help clinicians estimate the visual prognosis of an eye injury and guide referrals. It is particularly helpful when talking to patients and their family members about what to expect. The OTS isn’t perfect, however – it is correct 4 times out of 5 which means that clinicians must always apply their best clinical judgement when using it. Also, the OTS is only valid if the eye injury has been managed correctly. We hope that our article on the management of injuries will provide useful reminders. Enjoy the issue!

Articles in this issue –

Continuing professional development –

News and notices–